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Psych





New Track: "same fucking line" - NAH

NAH, a.k.a. Michael Kuhn, has been working on a full-length album, Michael, for the past year. As he gets closer to the finish line, we are treated to a dope-ass new track in "same fucking line". His rhythmic diction gets your blood racing before slyly laying down a hot groove and sucking you into his vortex of sound. Come be invigorated by the one-man band when NAH opens for Mykki Blanco on Thursday, Sept. 15 at PhilaMOCA! (Photo by Emily Burtner)





PREMIERE: bdRm - "She Comes in Waves II"

 No Movement Records is ironically making tons of moves, especially by way of label founder Jeremy Wilkins. Not only is he a very active member in two of the label's bands We Are Parasols and Hawks Do Not Share, but he's since taken elements of both projects to create yet another, called bdRm.

The first bdRm release, Are You Friendly?, explored dark and moody 'jazztronica' with existential themes flooding throughout the album's lyrical content. This time around, we're bringing to your ears a new bdRm track from the recently dropped Identité.

Identité is a conceptual darkwave album based on personal identity. It's considerably broken down into four parts - the first focusing on birth, awareness and early onset damage, the second and third focusing on realization and healing, and the fourth focusing on peace and acceptance. Today's track, "She Comes in Waves II," falls into part one.

It's heavily brooding with a video to match, like a trip through consciousness. Check out "She Comes in Waves II" below and head over to bdRm's Soundcloud to hear all of Identité.  





The Deli Philly's September Record of the Month: A Mountain of Nonsense - Them Jones

Philly rockers Them Jones craft far-out riffs and psych-drenched anthems, reviving and reinventing soundscapes reminiscent of the Age of Aquarius on their new LP A Mountain of Nonsense.

Beginning with the steady buzz of “Mended All Made Clean,” the five-piece's efforts make one take notice, as reverbed screams and gritty cymbals collide with satisfying repetition and impassioned diction. As if filling the narrative chasm between Mikal Cronin’s “Gone” and Ty Segall’s “Inside Your Heart,” Them Jones’ album opener sinks deep into the hearts of listeners without pretense or apology. “Hollow Man” captivates in a similar fashion by teaching its audience patience as atmospheric dissonance gives way to melodic guitar and harmonized vocals that paint a glaringly relatable portrait of a man with “wounds to mend.” A deliciously contemplative downer, the track is as haunting as its namesake suggests. Soon after its end, the infectious tempo and throbbing beat of “Outburst” fills the silence, switching the mood of the album from the musings of a contemplative loner to the pulsating heart of an unabashed romantic.

The bluesy growl of “One of These Days” casts a spell on its own terms, making the most of initially sparse but precise instrumentation, before blooming into an audible homage to the genre’s predecessors as well as its current greats. Furthered by “Acute Mountain Sickness Blues” and the addictive hook of “Honeytrap,” Them Jones prove that their metaphors are as memorable as their ability to shred. As the album progresses, the dreamy melody of “My Heroine Pretends” suitably precedes the delectable swagger of “Well Enough Alone,” which serves as the perfect prelude for the introspective depth of “Jennifer, My Plastic Girl” and “The Shrinking Violet Light,” which resurrects the candidness of Jay Reatard and the poetic genius of The White Stripes pre-De Stijil.

Ending with the delectably menacing “Now I Become Death” and trippy glory of “These Canyons,” A Mountain of Nonsense should be considered quintessential for any music lover. Them Jones’ official debut LP is well-deserving of heavy rotation and adoration. - Dianca London

September 2016
Them Jones
"A Mountain of Nonsense
"
mp3

Philly rockers Them Jones craft far-out riffs and psych-drenched anthems, reviving and reinventing soundscapes reminiscent of the Age of Aquarius on their new LP A Mountain of Nonsense.

 

Beginning with the steady buzz of “Mended All Made Clean,” the five-piece's efforts make one take notice, as reverbed screams and gritty cymbals collide with satisfying repetition and impassioned diction. As if filling the narrative chasm between Mikal Cronin’s “Gone” and Ty Segall’s “Inside Your Heart,” Them Jones’ album opener sinks deep into the hearts of listeners without pretense or apology. “Hollow Man” captivates in a similar fashion by teaching its audience patience as atmospheric dissonance gives way to melodic guitar and harmonized vocals that paint a glaringly relatable portrait of a man with “wounds to mend.” A deliciously contemplative downer, the track is as haunting as its namesake suggests. Soon after its end, the infectious tempo and throbbing beat of “Outburst” fills the silence, switching the mood of the album from the musings of a contemplative loner to the pulsating heart of an unabashed romantic.

 

The bluesy growl of “One of These Days” casts a spell on its own terms, making the most of initially sparse but precise instrumentation, before blooming into an audible homage to the genre’s predecessors as well as its current greats. Furthered by “Acute Mountain Sickness Blues” and the addictive hook of “Honeytrap,” Them Jones prove that their metaphors are as memorable as their ability to shred. As the album progresses, the dreamy melody of “My Heroine Pretends” suitably precedes the delectable swagger of “Well Enough Alone,” which serves as the perfect prelude for the introspective depth of “Jennifer, My Plastic Girl” and “The Shrinking Violet Light,” which resurrects the candidness of Jay Reatard and the poetic genius of The White Stripes pre-De Stijil.

 

Ending with the delectably menacing “Now I Become Death” and trippy glory of “These Canyons,” A Mountain of Nonsense should be considered quintessential for any music lover. Them Jones’ official debut LP is well-deserving of heavy rotation and adoration. - Dianca London





Arc Iris tour the US and UK and EU + talk about gear on Delicious Audio

Arc Iris was started by Jocie Adams (formerly of The Low Anthem) as a solo project in 2012 before enlisting the help of Zach Tenorio-Miller on keyboards and Ray Belli on drums, and in 2014 they released their genre bending debut that was influenced by everything from folk and country to jazz and cabaret. Their upcoming album Moon Saloon takes on a darker and more mysterious atmosphere, while continuing to use bold classical arrangements that make their sound unique. Their complexly composed songs feature a wide array of instruments and tender vocal harmonies that shape the band’s ethereal sound. The band is about to leave for an over a month long tour in the US and Europe. In anticipation of Moon Saloon's release on August 19th via Bella Union, our friends at Delicious Audio asked the band's keyboardist, Zach, about the band's gear and creative process - see link below.

Delicious Audio interview with Arc Iris.

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