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This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


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Andrew North's story is one worth telling, performance set for 06.21

The music of Andrew North is precisely what you would expect to listen to on a cheery Saturday night at your favorite Bean Town jazz club. As New England as a delicious cup of clam chowder or a walk by the seacoast, Andrew North's cheery piano melodies, and uplifting lyrics have that unifying feel to them; they evoke a strong sense of community. Backed by former bandmate and good friend Pete Casselman on drums, North stepped into a Burlington, VT studio to record Lost City, his first EP released in March that encompasses years of musical and personal discoveries. In “Out of Time” Casselman’s funky drumbeat drives North’s intricate jazz tunes while in “Go North” the upbeat tempo and tender piano embellishments ooze ardent devotion for the craft. The story of Andrew North is one of resilience, of returning to long lost passions, of acceptance and love. Andrew North’s story continues as he will perform June 21st at Market Days Music in Concord, NH. “Go North” is streaming for your enjoyment below. - Rene Cobar

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Jeanines prepare new album, play Trans-Pecos on 6/12

Hearkening back to the UK twee pop sound of the mid-80's, Brooklyn's Jeanines are set to release their self-titled debut album on June 14th. Partnering with Slumberland Records makes perfect sense as that label has specialized in next generation bands emulating the C86/early Creation sound since it's inception in 1989. The wistful lyrics, vocals and guitar of Alicia Jeanine and My Teenage Stride Jed Smith's bass and drums perfectly combine to create new songs within this timeless sound. “Either Way” (streaming below) captures the melancholy charm of original era bands like Talulah Gosh, who were as influential as any of the Sarah Records pioneers. It's jangly, indie-pop that couples doubt with a sense of hope (“you have got to stay.”) Just released new single “Too Late” (streaming here) takes that a step further, with a more frantic velocity echoing its lyrical sentiment of regret. The album is now available for preorder, while the band play next on 6/12 at Trans-Pecos, and 6/22 at Alphaville for their release show. -Dave Cromwell





Phoebe Ryan shows the strength of vulnerability in new music video for "A Thousand Ways"

Phoebe Ryan’s vocals have a haunting sharpness to them, greatly showcased in the powerful hooks of her new single “A Thousand Ways.” The track's music video (streaming below) is gritty shot-for-shot and matches the intensity of the mighty percussion in the choruses. The verses are calm and accompanied by trickling acoustic guitar notes, with Ryan’s vocals commanding the sonic storm that intensifies toward the end of the track. The New Jersey-native’s confidently vulnerable attitude in the song is somewhat reminiscent of Halsey, with whom it shares a magnetic and intense appeal. Check out “A Thousand Ways” to see what we mean. - Rene Cobar

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Katie Rush returns with new R&B-glazed album Stage Life

Katie Rush is everything that is great about synth-pop music: the group confidently delivers a sonic meteor shower that dazzles with its dreamy synth melodies and sonorous bass lines. The harmonious flow of the band’s latest album Stage Life comes from R&B-lacquered vocals and essential drum beats. The group’s ten-track album is a sweet ride from start to finish that is powered by the tender yet sophisticated singing style of lead vocalist Katie Wagner. Think of Katie Rush as a soulful alternative to synth-pop group of the moment Chvrches. The record is dedicated to the memory of band member Sam Mehran who helped write, produce, mix, and master the album. We have the title track here for you. - Rene Cobar





The Weird Years offer a new brand of folk music with their self-titled EP

The few tracks that have been released by the newly formed Brooklyn quartet The Weird Years showcase a unique hybrid of folk music. Employing slowly strummed guitars and vocal harmonies, the group initially shroud their sound with simplicity, dwelling on themes revolving around the march of time and the paradoxical feelings that come with being alone. It's only after prolonged listening that their DNA unravels, revealing a double helix that equally relishes in a slow-burning ambiance. It's an arresting combination which makes their EP deserving to be unpacked patiently. -Tucker Pennington

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