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deli cover

August 2014
Vinyl Thief
""Fathoms"
"
mp3

In high school, my friend Craig Lee took it upon himself to educate me on what to do when I got high, which was: take a 311 CD and play it through Windows media player, and set the visualization to “Ambience.” With those days behind me (and a few subsequent years lost devil-sticking for tips as I followed 311 tours) I had long forgotten that particular use for Windows until I listened to Vinyl Thief’s debut album, “Fathoms.”

 

Released July 22nd, “Fathoms” listens like an entity. Granted, all albums vary song to song, and this one is no different, but few pluck the same rubber band in your brain and sustain it throughout it the duration. Fewer still can be so closely likened to getting lost watching a pixelated visualization of music on your ’01 Dell, wondering:“Whoa, how did they know to do that?”

 

Vinyl Thief is a synth driven powerhouse of a band that has been gathering acclaim since the release of their “Rebel Hill” EP in 2012. The group has essentially come of age playing together, from their high school inception to logging hours of practice in a church-sanctuary-turned-rehearsal space to perfect the sound and rapport that makes Vinyl Thief extraordinary. There are not many bands with such an expert handle on their sound.

 

There are a few anchors in Vinyl Thief that make them so listenable. Their synthesizers are going to do something beautiful. Grayson Proctor’s vocals are going to run through an impressive range without ever sounding forced or theatrical. And every song is going to reliably blow your mind in some way. It might be on a smaller scale, like when the guitar breaks the silence after the bridge in “London” with what I can only imagine a swoon would sound like. Or it could be big, like when the track “Rebel Hill” finally reaches a crescendo after a series of goosebump-inducing change-ups. The band has a knack for zig-ing when a zag is expected, going soft instead of loud, or even bigger when they’re already turned up.

 

Vinyl Thief is one of the best examples of the modern face of Nashville music, where already talented musicians go through great pains to learn their craft and the business around it. This is a band that is one sync away from national exposure. Be prepared to hear much more Vinyl Thief after Apple or Toyota licenses one of their tracks. Considering that “Fathoms” is a collection of their best material meticulously recorded and lovingly presented like a bowl of all-red jelly beans ready for the grabbing, this is only a matter of time. –Terra James-Jura


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scene blog

portland

July 2014
Talkative
"Hot Fruit Barbeque
"
mp3

Whitnessing the growth of Portland punky psych-pop outfit, Talkative, over the years, has been an absolute pleasure. Each of their albums has a home in my music library and heart. Not to mention the dudes in the band are some of the finest gents among the Portland music community. I knew we'd be good buds from the first time I met guitarist/synth/vocalist Cody Berger in 2011, after my own band played a show at Kelly's Olympian, and I reluctantly let an intoxicated Cody, saying "hey man, I heard you like to smoke pot too, cool!" hop a ride back to the SE with me to shorten his walk home. 

Talkative's latest stoney efforts, Hot Fruit Barbeque, takes their raucous high energy sounds to new levels. And it's not just upscaled production. The album feels more purposeful than their previus work, each song commanding you to yield and listen or dance (I prefer to wiggle). Lead single "Rudy Huckleberry" will be left lingering in your ear as you try to recreate Berger's catchy but mostly unintelligible vocal hooks for the remainder of the day. Equally as catcy, "Snow Jobs" and "Hava Nagila" showcase the impressively explosive capabilities of Casunn Taft's drumming. The boys explore slightly more worldly rhythms and tones alongside their distorted guitars on "Gentrifuckation" for an overall excelent, bouncy, party track. 

Hot Fruit Barbeque easily falls at the top of my list of favorite albums in 2014. Listen here.

- Travis Leipzig

4th of July with Old Light, XDS, Bearcubbin'! and Talkative

Exercise your right to party this Freedom Day at a block-wide festival thrown outside Bunk Bar (SE Taylor and Water ave). Along with all the necessary 4th of July features, i.e. fireworks, beer, barbecuing, flag-waving, and general revelry, there will also be live music from Old Light, XDS, Bearcubbin'!, and Talkative. Yes, there will be services to excite all five senses this Stars and Stripes Day, and chillin out to Old Light’s dreamy psych pop may just inspire a sixth if you know what I mean. They’re headlining the show, and if you haven’t heard these guys yet, get with the program; it’s like having our very own Portland garage infused Wooden Shjips. 

Starting off at 5pm sharp is Talkative, the first indie space punk band to be fully endorsed by Thomas Jefferson himself. Their quintessentially American unapologetic, devil-may-care style is the perfect preamble to a night of nationalistic pride. Up next, test your understanding of music theory with Bearcubbin’s jazzy, arcane, math rock. Then XDS starts the cerebral fireworks show with their kooky brand of world psych pop. With just enough of a hook to grasp onto, their music takes you on a journey through a vortex of texture, syncopation, and effects. Old Light will close out the block party with a punctuational cannon blast, before your inebreated meanderings take your night in a new direction (go to PALS Clubhouse immediately after for a killer secret house show!). 

- Bryce Woodcock 


Photos: Orquestra Pacifico Tropical at the Doug Fir Lounge

 

Click here to check out the rest of the photos from Orquestra Pacifico Tropical's release show for Rio Frio at the Doug Fir Lounge 6/25. Photos by Todd Walberg.

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THE DELI NYC'S TEN YEAR ANNIVERSARY ISSUE IS OUT!

On a Friday night of December 2004, at Manhattan venue Sin-e' in Attorney Street, an emerging NYC band with a home recorded debut album played The Deli's launch party. It was a packed crowd and everyone was holding the first issue of The Deli, whose cover these upstarts were gracing. That band was Grizzly Bear. It remains one of the most exciting nights of my life, the night I understood that this magazine had a shot at being here to stay.

Now, this ten-year anniversary issue hopes to be a(nother) celebration of this great scene, in a less cluttered, more narratorial and visually appealing form thanks to art critic Brian Chidester's work as a guest editor. This issue also comes with my deep hope for NYC to keep churning out exceptional music of all kinds for the foreseeable future.

FIND THE PAPER ISSUE OF THE DELI IN MANHATTAN AND BROOKLYN, READ IT IN PDF HERE, OR BUY IT HERE FOR JUST $5.

Paolo De Gregorio,
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher

The cover of the 1st Issue of The Deli (December 2004)


Just Lions Release 'Great. Okay.'

There are good and bad ways to start the summer. Just Lions have chosen the good route with the release of their new EP, Great. Okay. which they will celebrate with a free show this Monday night, 6.30, at Mississippi Studios. The three-piece band, known for it’s pop rock energy and jazz tendencies, latest work hits these core characteristics while expanding into a deeper core of their sound. 

The EP begins with the title track and immediately hits you with sweet whistling and a catchy rhythm that makes for easy listening. This song brings a radio friendly presence to the album, which was even aired on 94.7 FM (Clear Channel's New Rock/Alt radio station) earlier this month. Next, the band drifts into a jazzy atmosphere that is very prevalent during their live performances. Relying on guitar work and jazz scales, “Everything Goes Away” remains a very free flowing song that is slightly reminiscent of something by Jack Johnson (you know, if Jack Johnson was cool and rocked a little harder). The closing track is the heaviest. “On the Road” is much more than a track with the same name as the iconic book by Kerouac. Opening guitar riffs unleash into a fury while the harmonious vocals smooth things over. This song ends with an exploding, bluesy guitar solo that only makes you wonder what this band has in store for the future.

Although this EP is short with only three songs, the release show Monday night will be packed with good music. Jammy psych-heads Bear & Moose open the night, followed by fellow jammy psych-heads Animal Eyes, and Just Lions close out the night, where you will be able to see what Great. Okay. is all about and much more.

- Colin Hudson


New Release: Talkative's Hot Fruit Barbeque

Whitnessing the growth of Portland punky psych-pop outfit, Talkative, over the years, has been an absolute pleasure. Each of their albums has a home in my music library and heart. Not to mention the dudes in the band are some of the finest gents among the Portland music community. I knew we'd be good buds from the first time I met guitarist/synth/vocalist Cody Berger in 2011, after my own band played a show at Kelly's Olympian, and I reluctantly let an intoxicated Cody, saying "hey man, Boone says you like to smoke pot too, cool!" hop a ride back to the SE with me to shorten his walk home. 

Talkative's latest efforts, Hot Fruit Barbeque, takes their raucous high energy sounds to new levels. And it's not just upscaled production. The album feels more purposeful than their previus work, each song commanding you to yield and listen or dance (I prefer to wiggle). Lead single "Rudy Huckleberry" will be left lingering in your ear as you try to recreate Berger's catchy but mostly unintelligible vocal hooks for the remainder of the day. Equally as catcy, "Snow Jobs" and "Hava Nagila" showcase the impressively explosive capabilities of Casunn Taft's drumming. The boys explore slightly more worldly rhythms and tones alongside their distorted guitars on "Gentrifuckation" for an overall excelent, bouncy, party track. 

Hot Fruit Barbeque falls at the top of my list of favorite albums in 2014. Talkative will cellebrate the release of their new album this Sunday at Rontoms with the help of fellow psych-pop greats, Grandparents

- Travis Leipzig

 

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New Release: Jellyfish Brigade's Diving Lessons

Portland hip hop duo Jelyfish Brigade put out a new album this week titled Diving Lessons, which they will celebrate the release of this Saturday, June 28 at the Goodfoot. Pulling lyrical influence from traditional folk music, emcee Lucas Dix rhymes through stories about nature, the supernatural, and real life shit, while producer Jeffrey Acciaioli's dark and melodic beats serve as the backbone of the album. Helping celebrate the album release, Mimi Naja Trio, Jay Cobb Anderson Band, MC Botzy (Minneapolis) and Stephen Sauer will be sharing the Goodfoot's stage with the Brigade Saturday night. 

Stream Diving Lessons on Jellyfish Brigade's bandcamp page and name your own price to download the album. Below, check out their video of a folky acoustic rendition of "Man the Riverboat" featuring members of Fruition and Brad Parsons Project. 

Travis Leipzig

 

 

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Premier: Orquestra Pacifico Tropical's Rio Frio

Before I dive into describing the intoxicating mix of sounds that Orquestra Pacifico Tropical have etched onto their debut record, Rio Frio (cold river), I would like to offer a brief history of the music they play so passionately, Cumbia. Cumbia has been around for hundreds of years, historians believe that the pulsing rhythms in which the genre is founded originated in African tribes and brought to Central America by slaves during the Spanish colonization in what is now Columbia. There these rhythms met claves, flutes, guitars and, eventually, accordions to create the cross-cultural dance music that we now call Cumbia.

The rhythms of Cumbia have been evolving since their inception, yet always retaining a groove that makes the style universally danceable. Orquestro Pacifico Tropical have taken this groove and added hazy guitar tones, roaring horns and a storm of percussive dexterity to create an album that is completely contagious. The opening track, “Macondo” sets an energetic tone with sweeping rhythms, blasting horns and anthemic vocal shouts. It got me dancing around my apartment immediately, and I didn’t stop moving my feet until the last note was hit and the cacophonic introduction to “Andalucia” began. From here the album moves through surfy guitar leads (“Petrolero"), hypnotic drumming (“Negra”) and vocal shouts that made me wish I spoke more Spanish so that I could sing along. The music that Orquestra Pacifico Tropical have created on Rio Frio is equally traditional, novel and undeniably fun. Join them for their record release show with 1939 Ensemble and Point Juncture, WA at Doug Fir Lounge on Wednesday, June 25th to pick up a copy on vinyl for yourself. 

- Ben Toledo 


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