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Artist of the Month
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July 2015
Overwatcher
"Metaphysics
"
mp3

Do some stretches, because Nashville-based Overwatcher are bringing the melodic hardcore madness, and some soft moshing is imminent.

Although a relatively new band, the guys have come out swinging with red-blooded live shows and a victory in our Band of the Month competition. The release of their debut EP "Metaphysics" will undoubtedly add fuel to their face-melting fire.
 
With the ample sound you'd expect from a six-piece, the guys are bringing a new vitality to the melocore scene. "Metaphysics" features the melodic exploration and merciless pulse of predecessors like Touche Amore, mewithoutyou and Defeater, with the brutal lyrical honesty and self-awareness of post-grad punk kids.
 
Overwatcher has created an engaging and discerning debut EP that is just as dynamic (if not more so) live. During their most recent performance at The East Room, lead vocalist Alex MacWilliam, performing through a head-wound he earned early in the set, filled up every ounce of space he could get his hands on. Often on tables and chairs, level with the crowd, even lying down, MacWilliam lead his crew through an intense, energetic set. Whether the audience is of five or 5,000, the performance remains wholehearted, and there is definitely something to be said for that.
 
Overwatcher is putting a refreshing spin on melodic hardcore, and "Metaphysics" is a testament to their musical prowess and clear passion for the genre. And, I can only assume this is just the beginning.  -Caroline Bowman

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Chill Witch gets wild and wonderful on debut

Chill With is a group made up of people who sure know how to put together an album, and it shows on the collective's debut full-length. Primitive in its use of modern instrumentation, the mood is like one day we all bombed our civilizations out and the descendants of the few survivors found our synthesizers buried in the dirt. You can dance to it, sure, but any dance to Chill Witch has to involve some sudden shaking and convulsing, so you'd best commit to it. -Austin Phy

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Thin Veil's self-titled EP is a foreboding offering

Thin Veil, the new moniker for the music of James Vincent Oblon, is as close as an album can be to metal without being metal. Make no mistake: despite a lack of roaring solos and crash cymbal freakouts, the album is heavy and foreboding in the most laid-back way, like a wise old demon lounging on a throne of skulls. Oblon chugs and drones, hisses and wails, and creates a pervasive atmosphere of unease from start to finish.  -Austin Phy

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The Deli Philly's May Record of the Month: Love Songs - Residuels

Philly rock ‘n’ rollers Justin Pittney, Mike Cammarata, and Kyle Garvey (a.k.a. Residuels) revamp essential garage cuts on their latest release Love Songs. Available now via Suicide Bong Tapes, the three-piece’s cassette kick-starts with a full-throttle rendition of Rich Berry’s “Have Love Will Travel.” The power trio’s frenetic take on the song that put bands like Thee Headcoatees and Paul Revere & the Raiders on the map is far from derivative. From the very first lick of guitar, Pittney and his bandmates tap into the original fury at the center of “Have Love Will Travel,” using crashing riffs and uninhibited vocals reminiscent of The Gories.
 
Residuels’ take on The Damned’s debut single “New Rose” is similarly inventive, giving listeners an unadulterated taste of the original song’s rhythm and fuzz. Pittney channels Dave Vanian with ease, mimicking the legendary Londoner’s punk-as-fuck diction as if he wrote the track himself. Clocking in at a few seconds shy of three minutes, the second track on Love Songs is arguably one of the best renditions of the ‘76 single.
 

The same could be said for “You’re Gonna Miss Me.” Opening with a guttural scream, the group’s tribute to psych-rock icons The 13th Floor Elevators is perfectly executed, with each chord and clash of cymbal adding to the instrumented intensity of the already well-loved garage classic. “You’re Gonna Miss Me” feels like a stubborn tantrum, the sonic manifestation of the sort of longing that is borne of desperation and pure desire that is mirrored in the album’s closer “It Girl.” Residuels’ jangly styling of one the most lovelorn (and heart-wrenching) tracks on The Brian Jonestown Massacre's fifth LP is equally captivating, despite being one of Love Song’s quietest tracks, leaving listeners smitten. For die-hard fans of garage rock and newcomers alike, Love Songs doesn’t just pay homage to the genre’s past; it celebrates its vibrant present. - Dianca London

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May 2016
Residuels
"Love Songs
"
mp3
Philly rock ‘n’ rollers Justin Pittney, Mike Cammarata, and Kyle Garvey (a.k.a. Residuels) revamp essential garage cuts on their latest release Love Songs. Available now via Suicide Bong Tapes, the three-piece’s cassette kick-starts with a full-throttle rendition of Rich Berry’s “Have Love, Will Travel.” The power trio’s frenetic take on the song that put bands like Thee Headcoatees and Paul Revere & the Raiders on the map is far from derivative. From the very first lick of guitar, Pittney and his bandmates tap into the original fury at the center of “Have Love Will Travel,” using crashing riffs and uninhibited vocals reminiscent of The Gories.
 
Residuels’ take on The Damned’s debut single “New Rose” is similarly inventive, giving listeners an unadulterated taste of the original song’s rhythm and fuzz. Pittney channels Dave Vanian with ease, mimicking the legendary Londoner’s punk-as-fuck diction as if he wrote the track himself. Clocking in at a few seconds shy of three minutes, the second track on Love Songs is arguably one of the best renditions of the ‘76 single.
 
The same could be said for “You’re Gonna Miss Me.” Opening with a guttural scream, the group’s tribute to psych-rock icons The 13th Floor Elevators is perfectly executed, with each chord and clash of cymbal adding to the instrumented intensity of the already well-loved garage classic. “You’re Gonna Miss Me” feels like a stubborn tantrum, the sonic manifestation of the sort of longing that is borne of desperation and pure desire that is mirrored in the album’s closer “It Girl.” Residuels’ jangly styling of one the most lovelorn (and heart-wrenching) tracks on The Brian Jonestown Massacre's fifth LP is equally captivating, despite being one of Love Song’s quietest tracks, leaving listeners smitten. For die-hard fans of garage rock and newcomers alike, Love Songs doesn’t just pay homage to the genre’s past; it celebrates its vibrant present. - Dianca London

Marie & The Moans Opening for No Joy at KFN May 1

Marie & The Moans are bringing their eccentric songwriting to Kung Fu Necktie this Sunday, opening for No Joy and Creepers, and prodding your eardrums with a little musical unconventionality. The group exhibits an almost willful rejection of traditional or intuitive melody structure, yet make no concessions in accessibility. Percussion clatters and stumbles, while an innumerable amount of electronic tones bump and fall across each other, giving an overall impression of narrowly maintained order, as if the very compositions can’t be contained by their recordings. Singer Bridget Boylan’s stoic voice stitches at the seams of disorder, and lends a contrasting elegance to the music, which also serves as an orientating force that guides you through each manically tangled tune. Show up early to catch these Philly locals before ‘gazing out on the ethereal wings of No Joy. Kung Fu Necktie, 1250 N. Front St., 8pm, $10, 21+ - Bryce Woodcock

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Which of these emerging local acts should be The Deli Nashville's next Artist of the Month?



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